The Wiksten Kimono Review

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I don’t know if you saw my dance on Instagram recently, but if you haven’t you need to head on over and watch how the Wiksten Kimono jacket can MOVE! Ha!  I bought a fog machine you guys.  JUST FOR THIS DANCE. That is how nuts I really am;)

I am head over heels in love with this jacket. I had been eyeing the pattern for awhile, especially after seeing this one.  One day I was at Joann’s JUST for some twill (like you can ever leave with one thing) when I saw that fabric above and knew it was destined to become a Wiksten Kimono. I had bought the fur (also JoAnn’s) to make crazy pockets for the Fulton Sweater Blazer, but then decided against it. One day I saw it lying on top of the jacket fabric (which is a thick wool blend non-stretch knit I believe) and realized they were a (non)match made in heaven!!

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This jacket only took me like 4 hours to make (sewing time). FOUR! So when my 9 year old daughter stole it from me hot off the sewing machine, I told her I’d use all my scraps to make her one. (Then when that one was finished, my OTHER daughter wanted to steal it, so I had to go back to the store to get more fabric!)

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JACKET THIEF NUMBER ONE.

Here are the adjustments I made to the pattern to sew it for a child. This fits both of my girls, ages 7 and 9, and even me! The great thing about this jacket style is that its meant to be oversized, so it will last them to adulthood;)

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I took the armpit area in by 1/2″IMG_2261

I cut the length at this line. It’s the very first line below where it says “short.”IMG_2263

I shortened the sleeves and sleeve lining by 3″ each.

My jacket is lined with Wool suiting fabric (from my stash), but I lined my girl’s coats with scraps of linen and muslin I! The smaller size means it doesn’t require much fabric. In fact, when I was making the first coat, I didn’t have quite enough fabric for the sleeves, so I cut two halves (and added 3/8 in) and serged them together to make a whole sleeve. I also serged scraps together to make the pockets. (For the pockets, I just used the smaller size pattern piece.)

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If you look closely you can see the pieced together pockets. (This jacket was an excellent way to not add fabric scraps to the landfills!)IMG_2403 (1)

For MY jacket I did the under collar in the same fabric as the main body, but for my girls’ jackets I just took a long rectangle of the fur and folded it over (well I attached it right sides together to the front, and then folded it and rolled under the edge to attach it to the inside. Then I sewed verrrrry slowly through that darn furry fur.

I’ve been wearing mine non-stop and I feel like a rockstar every time I put it on!

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2 thoughts on “The Wiksten Kimono Review

  1. Anna Miller says:

    Wow! I made a Wiksten kimono out of the same fabric. I made a long version, I love your version and the faux fur really takes it to the next level. I may need to add some fur to mine. I am inspired by all your projects.Everything here is beautiful!

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