Review and hacks: Mini-Cottesloe and Mini-Eucalypt patterns for kids!

I’ll keep sewing her clothes until she makes me stop! I was so excited to try out these two mini versions of the adult patterns by Megan Nielsen. I am always on the look out for simple, quick-sewing patterns that I can make for my kids without costing my precious sewing-for-me time (here is where I would insert the hand covering eyes emoji….).

These two patterns fit the bill exactly AND they had sizes that still worked for my growing child! Let me tell you what I loved about them and the tiny hacks I made.

I tested this mini-cottesloe pattern at the beginning of summer– just in time because my daughter had grown too tall for her swimsuits! I used Spoonflower Sport Lycra in the fill-a-yard of my own large and small dash prints to make a swimsuit that LOOKS like I sewed two fabrics together but really just cut it out on the line where the two prints met.

On my swimsuit I had actually sewn those two prints together at the waist, so hers was much faster! One of my favorite things about this pattern (for both of us), is that we can run jump, play and swim and everything just stays put/stays covered!! This is so great when you’re playing at the family pool, or in the waves at the beach.

One day I know she won’t be thrilled to match me, but thankfully she was still excited about it this past summer!

I loved the high scoop back version. (There is a low–back version with a tie as well.) As a former high-school swim team-er I prefer function over fashion (not that this isn’t fashionable, but it was definitely functional (no straps falling!)).

***My daughter is 10 but some of her measurements fell into the size 12 (top of the size range) so I sewed that size for her and it was perfect. If she grows next summer I think I could just lengthen the torso and she’d still fit this pattern.

Now THIS pattern (mini-eucalypt) was given to me JUST before school started which was perfect! I needed to make a few things for my tall child, but didn’t have a lot of free time to do so. Luckily this thing sews up very fast.

Sewing and Pattern Hacking details:

*I sewed a size 12 (didn’t look at the sizing but based on the swimsuit went with the same size). It was a little large but I think its an “easy” fit so its meant to be bigger and it will last much longer on my growing girl!

*I extended the shoulder on the pattern piece but a couple inches to make it a cap sleeve.

*I used pre-made bias binding to cut down time.

*I added some big pockets (they don’t take long) for fun!

* I let my child pick her fabric out of my larger scraps, ensuring that it would be something she’d actually wear (and yay for scrap-busting!)

*I made a matching scrunchie from this pattern.

*I sewed the center front seam– but instead of cutting two front pieces, I just cut the pattern on the fold and THEN sewed it RST before topstitching the seam down.

Next up was a shirt/tunic version of the mini-Eucalypt pattern! Again, I let her pick which fabrics and she chose these two colors. Initially I wasn’t feeling the boldness of the combo, since I didn’t have enough of either to do the front and back in the same color, but I pulled it together with the pockets (I think)! Again, yay for sustainability, as I used up beautiful bits of linen and cotton sateen that I would’ve hated to waste.

*This time I made my neck binding (using the pattern piece given), but just turned under the seam allowances of the armholes and hemline.

*I Did the same trick with the optional center seam. (I like that seam as I think it is a nice finish/design detail that elevates it a little.)

*I added some color-blocking by cutting the back and front out of different fabrics.

*Added pockets again!

The shorts I made for her last summer using this pattern and Ikea fabric!

……And this is how she felt!!! We love these new patterns by Megan Nielsen and I know you will too!

2 thoughts on “Review and hacks: Mini-Cottesloe and Mini-Eucalypt patterns for kids!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s